Announcing the Jackie Coat Sewalong!!

Remember this coat?

 
 

I get compliments everytime I wear it, plus it is so warm and easy to wear. 

I want to make myself another as the highly patterned tweed wool coating I used for this version really limits what I can wear it with – I only really style it with solids underneath.  I also want a version with longer sleeves and a mid thigh length rather than a hip length.

Jackie Coat

Velosewer (aka Maria from How Good is That) and I are pretty excited to announce that we are planning a sewalong for this pattern commencing mid July.  If anyone would like to join us, it’s a great starting pattern to learn basic tailoring techniques if you are a beginning seamstress or have never made a coat or anything fully lined before.  If you are a more experienced seamstress we would love you join us just for the fun.

Like most indi patterns, the initial outlay is more than a Big4 pattern but in return you get vastly superior instructions, old fashioned service and support plus of course if you are doing the sewalong, you get the support of Lena, Maria and myself as well as anyone else who would like to play along with us.

If you don’t yet have a copy of the pattern, you can win a FREE COPY this week.  Hop on over to the Iconic Patterns Blog and leave a comment on this post to be in the running.  The competition is open for everyone and will go for 1 week, closing on Saturday, the 17 of May 2014.

Otherwise, the pattern is available as printed version or for immediate download as a pdf.   View pattern page

As well as it being very easy to fit (no set in sleeeves!!), I think it is also a great pattern to hack.  I’ve been collecting some ideas for a while on my Swing Coat board on Pinterest.

We are planning some fun add-ons for those who join us – fabric giveaways, some fun pattern hacks and anything else we can wrangle up.

Over the next 8 weeks we will be posting about fabric choice, pattern prep and some hacks allowing plenty of time to get your copy of the pattern if you don’t already own it, and source your fabric and other supplies.

We have already started up a Flickr Group to share photos and in progress shots for when  the sewalong commences so feel free to request to join now although not much will be happening there until the start of the sewalong in July.
 

  • Oh yay! I love my Jackie Coat! Everyone should make one.

  • Oh yay! I love my Jackie Coat! Everyone should make one.

  • This sounds fun! I would love to add it to http://swoodsonsays.com/sew-a-long-calendar/ – is the sew along starting now? or in mid-july? Thanks!

  • This sounds fun! I would love to add it to http://swoodsonsays.com/sew-a-long-calendar/ – is the sew along starting now? or in mid-july? Thanks!

  • Ooh your social sewing calender is brilliant. The sewalong starts July 15.

  • Oh yay. I feel the same way.

  • It’s a pattern with such classic lines, not to mention being able to throw it on over just about anything! Have fun doing the sewalong, I won’t be sewing but I will be reading 🙂

  • It's a pattern with such classic lines, not to mention being able to throw it on over just about anything! Have fun doing the sewalong, I won't be sewing but I will be reading 🙂

  • Great, have it linked up!

  • Can’t wait 🙂

  • Can't wait 🙂

  • My fabric arrived today! Of course, it’s summer here and a million degrees outside so it seems funny to by wool coating. I have never sewn a coat before, and honestly have had minimal success with clothes in general. I am curious to see what kind of interfacing you suggest. I have no idea what I should buy.

    • Jackie is a really great beginner pattern and you’ll get heaps of extra help in the sewalong. I’m going to do a whole post devoted to interfacing as that is often where I have gone wrong in the past and it makes such a difference to the finished garment. So glad you are joining us!

  • Katie Schulz

    My fabric arrived today! Of course, it's summer here and a million degrees outside so it seems funny to by wool coating. I have never sewn a coat before, and honestly have had minimal success with clothes in general. I am curious to see what kind of interfacing you suggest. I have no idea what I should buy.

  • Jackie is a really great beginner pattern and you'll get heaps of extra help in the sewalong. I'm going to do a whole post devoted to interfacing as that is often where I have gone wrong in the past and it makes such a difference to the finished garment. So glad you are joining us!

  • Anne Elliot

    My fabric is not so much my choice but what was available at The Fabric Store. An amazing orange-red, which I choose to call coquelicot (poppy in French) after one of Monet’s paintings from 1873: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Coquelicots. It makes the in-your-face colour a little more endearing. The lining is a orange-red and off-white checked silk.

    The fabric is a wool mohair with some polyester, I think, more light weight than it appears but with plenty of body. With a serious nap, I will remember to cut everything facing the right way!

    I tested washing a small piece and it came out exactly as it went into the water. That seems somewhat remarkable and I now wonder if I dare go the whole way. My pattern arrived today, so once I get an idea of the pattern layout (none came with the pattern and I have already complained about that :)), I will pre-wash a larger piece. I will wash the silk, too, then wrap it in towels and iron while still damp.

    I am still to consider what my interfacing choices are. Fusible on a fabric with a nap?? What do you recommend?

  • Anne Elliot

    My fabric is not so much my choice but what was available at The Fabric Store. An amazing orange-red, which I choose to call coquelicot (poppy in French) after one of Monet's paintings from 1873: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Coquelicots. It makes the in-your-face colour a little more endearing. The lining is a orange-red and off-white checked silk.

    The fabric is a wool mohair with some nylon, I think, more light weight than it appears and with plenty of body. With a serious nap, I will remember to cut it all facing the right way!

    I tested washing a small piece and it came out exactly as it went into the water. That seems somewhat remarkable and I now wonder if I dare go the whole way. My pattern arrived today, so once I get an idea of the pattern layout (none came with the pattern and I have already complained about that :)), I will pre-wash a larger piece. I will wash the silk, too, then wrap it in towels and ironoing while still damp.

    I am still to consider what my interfacing choices are. Fusible on a fabric with a nap?? What do you recommend?

  • Anne Elliot

    I have finally made the changes to the pattern that I had in mind and nearly finished sewing a proper muslin. I shall post photos tomorrow.

    Maria, the forward shoulder alteration has worked out but I have lost the exactness of the neckline for drafting my collar! Now will be done in part by draping… Perhaps the front and neck interface put together is near enough?

    My choice of interfacing has arrived. I posted a photo of trying three different thicknesses or types.

    ***I wonder if any of you can explain why a fusible interfacing is placed from the bottom edge up to say 1cm past the hem line vs. hair canvas, which is placed from 1cm below the hemline and up. See attached illustration of idea. What is the rationale?***

    Am I really the only sew-along’er?

    • Fantastic Anne. No, not the only sewalonger but others are being quiet or are further behind/still in prep stage. Others are going to join us in a few weeks once the Northern hemisphere starts moving out of summer.

      That’s an interesting question about the interfacing. I think with the hair canvas it is so the hem can be catch stitched to it for a hand tailored finish with a hand sewn lining whereas the fusible is used more for a machine tailored finish such as bagging the lining like we are doing.

      Can you true up your neckline seam by overlaying the original pieces to match the curves or is it a bit trickier than that? I didn’t do this adjustment so I am not sure how it affects the neckline. I’ll get Maria to get back to you on that.

  • Anne Elliot

    I have finally made the changes to the pattern that I had in mind and nearly finished sewing a proper muslin. I shall post photos tomorrow.

    Maria, the forward shoulder alteration has worked out but I have lost the exactness of the neckline for drafting my collar! Now will be done in part by draping… Perhaps the front and neck interface put together is near enough?

    My choice of interfacing has arrived. I posted a photo of trying three different thicknesses or types.

    ***I wonder if any of you can explain why a fusible interfacing is placed from the bottom edge up to say 1cm past the hem line vs. hair canvas, which is placed from 1cm below the hemline and up. See attached illustration of idea. What is the rationale?***

    Am I really the only sew-along'er?

  • Fantastic Anne. No, not the only sewalonger but others are being quiet or are further behind/still in prep stage. Others are going to join us in a few weeks once the Northern hemisphere starts moving out of summer.

    That's an interesting question about the interfacing. I think with the hair canvas it is so the hem can be catch stitched to it for a hand tailored finish with a hand sewn lining whereas the fusible is used more for a machine tailored finish such as bagging the lining like we are doing.

    Can you true up your neckline seam by overlaying the original pieces to match the curves or is it a bit trickier than that? I didn't do this adjustment so I am not sure how it affects the neckline. I'll get Maria to get back to you on that.

  • Anne Elliot

    I am glad I was able to get my muslin photos on the Flckr page tonight for feedback. I hope I haven’t asked too many questions and hope to have some critical feedback. For example, is the flaring now too much?

    I went to remove the hideous curtain muslin photos but decided to keep them. They show how close fitting the jacket really was in that thicker fabric in contrast to the calico of the latest muslin.

    • These photos are so helpful and very interesting. I am loving following your process. I should have taken more shots of my muslin work as I realise belatedly how useful these photos are.

  • Anne Elliot

    I am glad I was able to get my muslin photos on the Flckr page tonight for feedback. I hope I haven't asked too many questions and hope to have some critical feedback. For example, is the flaring now too much?

    I went to remove the hideous curtain muslin photos but decided to keep them. They show how close fitting the jacket really was in that thicker fabric in contrast to the calico of the latest muslin.

  • Anne Elliot

    Today I straightened the side seam for flare commencing higher up. Also did a SBA. It has dealt to some excess fabric under arm and across bust. Reflecting on the first muslin in thick Indian cotton, I am intrigued a SBA was now needed. I think my now diminutive dart makes the front somewhat shapeless.

    Janelle commented one time that she ended up returning to the original. That is my plan: to go back to the original sleeve to see where I may have helped the “twisting” along, perhaps in the forward shoulder adjustment. The sleeves do not have my diagonal wrinkles when hanging on the mannequin. Bony shoulders, lack of flesh on my arms and the thinness of the calico to the width of the sleeve all contribute to this.

    • I did spend a fair bit of time mucking around with changes and ended up ditching them all except for the centre front opening as they just didn’t work. The pattern as is has lovely lines and I am glad I didn’t change it too much. Did you see my flickr comment that I didn’t need a forward shoulder adjustment on this pattern even though I almost always need a 1cm adjustment. I have lop sided shoulders as well – my whole right side (shoulder and arm) is smaller than my left due to a childhood injury. I think I had similar twisting/wrinkles on one side at one stage but I decided to call it part of the raglan sleeve “charm” and just pressed ahead. In the finished coat which is more drapey than my muslin the sleeve seem to hang fine. I think. We will see what you guys have to say when I get my pictures up. ☺

      • Anne Elliot

        Interesting to hear about your issues and what you ended up doing. Also your lopsided area. I am still perplexed at where to next except for reverting to original sleeve before FSA. Wish I could pin fit myself! I still want to split sleeves into two.

        I did go right back to my basic bodice the other day and created raglan sleeves for it in order to see how my identified body issues might impact on the shape of raglan sleeves. I was trying to think “raglan sleeve thinking.” My front raglan sleeve definitely has a shape akin to what you suggested in dealing with the upper part of the sleeve.

        My fabric has beautiful body and drape and will alleviate some of the drama. Your fabric, which I know, has a lot of drape and a sturdiness that will hide what would be a wrinkle in lesser cloth.

  • Anne Elliot

    Today I straightened the side seam for flare commencing higher up. Also did a SBA. It has dealt to some excess fabric under arm and across bust. Reflecting on the first muslin in thick Indian cotton, I am intrigued a SBA was now needed. I think my now diminutive dart makes the front somewhat shapeless.

    Janelle commented one time that she ended up returning to the original. That is my plan: to go back to the original sleeve to see where I may have helped the "twisting" along, perhaps in the forward shoulder adjustment. The sleeves do not have my diagonal wrinkles when hanging on the mannequin. Bony shoulders, lack of flesh on my arms and the thinness of the calico to the width of the sleeve all contribute to this.

  • These photos are so helpful and very interesting. I am loving following your process. I should have taken more shots of my muslin work as I realise belatedly how useful these photos are.

  • I did spend a fair bit of time mucking around with changes and ended up ditching them all except for the centre front opening as they just didn't work. The pattern as is has lovely lines and I am glad I didn't change it too much. Did you see my flickr comment that I didn't need a forward shoulder adjustment on this pattern even though I almost always need a 1cm adjustment. I have lop sided shoulders as well – my whole right side (shoulder and arm) is smaller than my left due to a childhood injury. I think I had similar twisting/wrinkles on one side at one stage but I decided to call it part of the raglan sleeve "charm" and just pressed ahead. In the finished coat which is more drapey than my muslin the sleeve seem to hang fine. I think. We will see what you guys have to say when I get my pictures up. ☺

  • Anne Elliot

    Interesting to hear about your issues and what you ended up doing. Also your lopsided area. I am still perplexed at where to next except for reverting to original sleeve before FSA. Wish I could pin fit myself! I still want to split sleeves into two.

    I did go right back to my basic bodice the other day and created raglan sleeves for it in order to see how my identified body issues might impact on the shape of raglan sleeves. I was trying to think "raglan sleeve thinking." My front raglan sleeve definitely has a shape akin to what you suggested in dealing with the upper part of the sleeve.

    My fabric has beautiful body and drape and will alleviate some of the drama. Your fabric, which I know, has a lot of drape and a sturdiness that will hide what would be a wrinkle in lesser cloth.

  • Anne Elliot

    Janelle, how much overlap did you allow for in your centre front version, i.e. distance from centre front to edge (finished width)? And how wide the finished width of the interfacing? Perhaps just the same as the original pattern…

    • The same as the original pattern – even though I used much larger buttons I am small busted so any extra overlap needed was fine as I knew from my first version that there is plenty of ease in that area. So the finished measurements remained the same as the orginal pattern, the extra fabric on the wider side was just shifted/spread evenly over the left and right sides (making them both exactly the same) with no other changes to the pattern. 🙂

  • Anne Elliot

    Janelle, how much overlap did you allow for in your centre front version, i.e. distance from centre front to edge (finished width)? And how wide the finished width of the interfacing? Perhaps just the same as the original pattern…

  • The same as the original pattern – even though I used much larger buttons I am small busted so any extra overlap needed was fine as I knew from my first version that there is plenty of ease in that area. So the finished measurements remained the same as the orginal pattern, the extra fabric on the wider side was just shifted/spread evenly over the left and right sides (making them both exactly the same) with no other changes to the pattern. 🙂